February 20, 2018 | Rome, Italy | °C
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Biopics

Christine

Antonio Campos' take on the Christine Chubbock suicide is all about the stunning Rebecca Hall.

Drama

Lady Bird

Greta Gerwig's "Lady Bird" gets fine work from Soarise Ronan, but ultimately flubs the script.

Rome Adventure

Delmer Daves' 1962 film, while no "Roman Holiday" or "La Dolce Vita," possesses its own small pleasures.

Zodiac

A decade later David Fincher's serial killer film still stands tall as a study in administrative futility.

Phantom Thread

Paul Thomas Anderson's dives into the British fashion world of the 1950s, and creates an difficult romance.

American Made

Tom Cruise is in top form in Doug Liman's sly take on the life and times of one Barry Seal.

Horror

It Comes at Night

Trey Edward Shults' low budget thriller links a killer plague with human mistrust and fear wins out.

Thrillers

Double Indemnity

Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck are gifted actors but they can't dance the sizzle.

Science Fiction

Wonder Woman

Director Patty Jenkins' smart take on "Wonder Woman" is an action-movie lover's delight.

Alien: Covenant

Michael Fassbender steals the show (twice over) in director Ridley Scott's latest "Alien" prequel.




Date: 2017
Directed by: Darren Aronofsky
Starring: Javier Bardem, Jennifer Lawrence, Michelle Pfeiffer, Ed Harris

Mother!

The frustrated, blocked writer has been at the center of some excellent films, including "Sunset Boulevard" (1950, featuring a naive William Holden) and "The Shining" (1980, with an insane Jack Nicholson). The writer in "Mother!", a needy, self-consumed, nameless Javier Bardem, yearns to recapture the Famous Poet status he once had.

Seeking stimulation, intense experience, and ultimately adulation of the highest order, he invites a series of strangers into his isolated (it lacks even a driveway) Victorian mansion, much to the chagrin of his much younger, devoted, overwhelmed, socially isolated, and soon-to-be pregnant wife (Mother, played by Jennifer Lawrence).

Things get out of hand, first in small ways —guests/invaders, among them a wonderfully irritating Michelle Pfeiffer, violate the couple's space and privacy and call their relationship into question — then on an epic scale that some viewers will find excessive, others gross and offensive.

Religious symbolism abounds: Cain and Abel, the virgin birth, the stigmata, and a horrific communion. "Rosemary's Baby" meets "Apocalypse Now."

Reviewed by: William Graebner and Dianne Bennett
Day and Boarding International High School in the Heart of Rome

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