October 23, 2014 | Rome, Italy | Sunny 4°C
Search the archives:
Fiction
Nonfiction
Italy
Bios & Memoirs
History
Politics
Thrillers
Travel&Food
Sports&Leisure
   

History

Stalingrad

Antony Beevor's account of the Nazi-Soviet faceoff is chilling enough to stop you dead.

Sports&Leisure

What a Time it Was: The Best of W.C. Heinz on Sports

The most underrated and little-known American sportswriter is also the best.

Nonfiction

Nothing to Envy

In bleak and dark North Korea, Barbara Demick digs in to find a love story.

Unfamiliar Fishes

With the checkered history of Hawaii at her disposal, Vowell offers mostly kitsch.

Bottom of the 33rd

Minus Easter trimmings, Dan Barry has written a compelling baseball book.

The Long Season

Jim Brosnan's baseball reminscence is a rare bird: Words by a player who can write.

Mondo Agnelli: Fiat, Chrysler, and the Power of a Dynasty

Jennifer Clark's careful accounting of Fiat's ups and downs is essential Italy reading.

On the Natural History of Destruction

Understanding the whole of World War II requires digging into Sebald's musings.

Street Art Stories – Roma

Tracking Rome street art is a noble cause, but not when words get in the way.

Naples '44: An Intelligence Officer in the Italian Labyrinth

Little written about World War II and southern Italy rivals Lewis' memoir.




BOOK REVIEW
Messages to the World: The Statements of Osama bin Laden
By Osama bin Laden, edited and introduced by Bruce Lawrence; translated by James Howarth
Verso Books, 2005. 292 pages

Months before the invasion of Iraq, bin Laden offered this advice to enemies of radical Islam: “Pack your luggage and get out of our lands. We desire this only for your goodness, guidance, and righteousness, so do not force us to send you back as cargo in coffins.”

This, at first, was mocked.

There’s more: “Guantanamo is a historical embarrassment to America and its values, and screams into your hypocritical faces…”

This, at first, was discounted.

The unsettling part of reading zealots, in black hats or white, is their rational sensibility. Bin Laden is nothing if not PR-wise: “You are a nation that exploits women like consumer products or advertising tools, calling upon customers to purchase them.” He sounds at times like a Baptist preacher. What distinguishes bin Laden’s rhetoric is its ascent into militancy, which is gradual.

Saudi Arabia, his homeland, is the flashpoint. “The place of revelation,” he insists, is occupied by Christians and their lackeys. “A gloomy scenario,” he adds ruefully. Bin Laden began publishing his warnings in 1994. No one bothered assembling them until 2005 — in Britain, not the United States. The roots of 9/11, the book makes clear, are political and strategic, an ambitious move in a lurid chess game. “You fight, so you exist,” he says, redirecting Descartes. This is an important, highly lucid volume.

Reviewed by Book Staff
Everything you need to know about visiting or moving to Tuscany, Italy.